You’ve finally hit a wall. You know that you have a serious problem with substance abuse. It’s too big for one person to handle alone. Professional intervention is the only way to take charge of a life that is spinning out of control, butcaught in a vicious cycle that has been going on for far too long. Each day spent in addiction is a day that you lose a little bit more of yourself and forget who you used to be before the source of your addiction took over. Trying to go solo hasn’t worked. There have been too many failed attempts in the past. It’s time to get serious. You’re thinking about outpatient rehab to get a handle on what is happening your body, but you need to figure out where to start.

Do You Have to Go to Detox Before Rehab Begins?

Think of detox as first base when it comes to overcoming substance abuse. In order to make it all the way to home plate and a lasting recovery, it means going around all of the bases, including therapy, and support groups. You can’t get anywhere without going through detox first. Detox is the initial phase of treatment when there will be no access to the source of your addiction. While you are medically supervised, all traces of the toxins that have been building up in your system will be eliminated. The length of this process will depend on your drug of choice, how long you have been using, and how much you use on a regular basis. This period of treatment could last a week or more. It is based on the individual’s needs. Staff will respond accordingly.

What Happens During Detox?

You’ll be completely cut off from substance abuse. There will be no turning back or weaning yourself off. When you walk into your detox facility, you’ll leave drugs or alcohol at the door. Once detox begins, withdrawal is going to hit. Withdrawal is a combination of extreme cravings for your drug of choice and physical symptoms. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and uncontrollable shaking are typical. In some cases, seizures may happen. You’ll deal with emotional trauma as well as you struggle with depression, anxiety, and paranoia. This is the phase of treatment when people are ready to do anything to find relief and make all of the unpleasant symptoms go away. You have to hold on and stick it out. True recovery isn’t possible until you break free from your drug of choice.

People are Here to Help You Make it Through Detox and Beyond

You can make it through detox and get to the rehab phase of treatment. You just need the right support system. While an outpatient rehab will provide you with support and resources to overcome addiction, it is like walking a tightrope. It’s very easy to slip and fall, picking up bad habits once again when you are still at home. You’ll still be exposed to negative influences and be forced to deal with all of your responsibilities. When you choose outpatient treatment, it’s a challenge to make your recovery a top priority. Too many other obligations and distractions can get in your way. Consider inpatient rehab as a more effective alternative.

Get it Right the First Time

You’ve tried to quit substance abuse by yourself. It didn’t work. You’re thinking about outpatient rehab, but research has shown that inpatient treatment offers the greatest opportunities for success. When you enter an inpatient program, your recovery will be placed at the top of the list. It’s time to focus on getting better. Don’t let the source of your addiction control you any longer. Get the help you need from professionals who understand the recovery process. You will be treated with compassion and understanding. You’ll find yourself in the same boat with others who are going through similar problems. As you go to individual and group counseling, it will be a team effort to help you to be well again.

Let Us Help You to Turn Your Life Around

You feel like you’ve been going the wrong direction on a one way street for too long. Contact our representatives at 770-299-1677 to learn more about recovery options. Find out what kind of programs we offer so that you can get yourself going in the right direction. No matter how long substance abuse has been a part of your life, you can say good riddance and make it a part of your past.